Allen Township

Beginning at the northwest corner of section 2, in township 65, range 32; thence running east six miles, to the northeast corner of section 2, township 65, range 31; thence south six miles to the southeast corner of section 24, township 65, range 31; thence west six miles, to the southwest corner of section 35. township 65, range 32; thence north six miles. to the place of beginning, containing thirty-six square miles.

About one-third of Allen Township is timber land. The prairies generally are high and rolling, with numerous fertile valleys bordering the water courses. The township is well watered. The streams, in fact, are so admirably distributed that every portion of the township is supplied with living water. The East Fork of Grand River, with its tributaries. passes through the western part of the township. Big Rock Creek flows through the central part, in a southwesterly direction, finally uniting with the East Fork of the Grand. Little Rock enters the northeastern part of the township, meanders towards the southwest, and empties into the East Fork of the Grand, while Little Muddy rolls its turbid waters across the southeastern corner of the same, thus carrying moisture and fructification from the center to the entire circumference.

The township is underlaid with excellent building stone, which is quarried in many places near the surface. The soil is good and of a dark, rich color, producing all the cereals, and furnishing the best and most nutritious grasses.

Fletchall Township

Fletchall Township was named in honor of john Fletchall, who settled in Fletchall's Grove, in I846, and is bounded as follows: Beginning at the northwest corner of section 31, township 67, range 31, and running east six miles; thence south about six and three-fourths of a mile, thence west six miles, thence north six and three fourths ofa mile to the place of beginning.

The township contains about one-third timber. The prairie is generally uneven in surface, the land in the vicinity of Grant City, being characterized by high swelling ridges and low depressions, but exceedingly fertile.

The township has an abundance of water, which flows convenient to almost every quarter section. Prominent, among the streams which meander in various directions, are the Middle Fork of Grand River, with its affluents, and Marlow Branch, which is formed by the union of its two branches, near the southwestern corner of the township.

Greene Township

Beginning at the northwest corner of section l, township 65, range 33; thence running east seven miles, to the northeast corner of section 3, township 65, range 32; thence south six miles to the southeast corner of section 34, township 65, range 32; thence west seven miles, to the southwest corner of section 34, township 65. range 33; thence north six miles, to the place of beginning.

About one-fourth of Greene Township is timber, consisting of the usual variety indigenous to this climate. The land away from the streams is generally quite rolling, but exceedingly productive. The West Fork of Grand River flows centrally and southwest through the township; its affluents water the western part of the township, and Bear Creek flows through the northeast.

As an agricultural district, Greene Township is not, perhaps, excelled by any other in the county. It is the home of a number of large farmers and stock raisers, and is settled up with a thrifty class of citizens.

Middle Fork Township

Beginning at the northwest corner of section 2, range 31, township 63; thence running east six miles; thence south six miles; thence west six miles; thence north six miles, to the place of beginning.

About one-third of the township is timber. Some fine valleys. The prairie land is high and rolling, but well adapted to agricultural purposes. The surface of the township is admirably veined with water courses, among which are the Middle Fork of Grand River (after which the township was called), Marlow Branch, and Bear Creek. Bear Creek is in the west part of the township, while Marlow Branch, the Middle Fork of Grand River, and the tributaries of the East Fork of Grand River pass through the center and eastern portions.

Smith Township

Beginning at the northwest corner of section 31, township 67, range 30, thence running east six miles to the northeast corner of section 36, township 67, range 30; thence running south seven miles to the southeast corner of section 36, township 66, range 30; thence west six miles to the southwest corner of section 31, township 66, range 30; thence north seven miles to the place of beginning.

One-third of the township is timber, consisting of oak, hickory, elm, cottonwood, ash and other varieties. Much of the prairie is high and rolling. The country, however, surrounding Allendale is more level and stretches out into a broader and more gently undulating surface.

The township is permeated by a number of streams, among which are the East Fork of Grand River, which enters the township near the northeast corner and passes out near the southwest corner; Lot's Creek, which enters the township on the east and near the center, and Big Rock Creek, which flows through the extreme southeast corner.

Rock for building purposes is found along the banks of the East Fork of Grand River, and is seen cropping out elsewhere in the township.

Union Township

Beginning at the northwest corner of section 34, township 67, range 33, and running east nine miles; thence south six and three-quarter miles; thence west nine miles; thence north six and three-quarter miles, to the place of beginning.

About one-third of Union Township consists of timber land, which borders the water courses. The timber is generally of a good quality, and grows about as rapidly as it is cut down and utilized. A large portion of the prairie is high and rolling. There is, however, much magnificent bottom land lying upon each side of Platte River and the West Fork of Grand River, both of which flow through the township. The East Fork of Grand River, entering the township at the northeast corner, flows in a southwest direction until it reaches section 16, township 66, range 32, thence flowing almost due south. Platte River enters the township on the north about the center, flowing in a southwesterly direction for a distance of about three miles, when it flows due south. The two streams above named, with their tributaries, furnish an inexhaustible supply of good water.

The soil of this township is everywhere rich and productive. No quarries of stone and no coal have as yet been discovered in the township.


The History of Gentry and Worth Counties, Missouri, National Historical Company, 1882.