1894 Death Notices in the St. Joseph, Missouri Herald, Gazette and Daily News

Monica Schirmer Eshelman has sent in her abstract of the 1894 deaths mentioned in the St. Joseph Missouri Herald, Gazette and Daily News. She’s able to work faster because there are now only two newspapers, but also because the further you go back, the fewer obituaries and death notices are available. But she still parties on! Thanks, Monica!

1895 Death Notices in the St. Joseph, Missouri Herald and Daily News

Monica Schirmer Eshelman has sent in her abstract of the 1895 deaths mentioned in the St. Joseph Missouri Herald and Daily News. She’s able to work faster because there are now only two newspapers, but also because the further you go back, the fewer obituaries and death notices are available. But she still parties on! Thanks, Monica!

1898 Death Notices in the St. Joseph Missouri Herald, Gazette and Daily News

Monica Schirmer Eshelman has sent in her abstract of the 1896 deaths mentioned in the St. Joseph Missouri Herald, Gazette and Daily News.

1966 Missouri Death Certificates are Scanned!

Got the email I’ve been waiting for — the 1966 Missouri death certificates have been scanned and are ready for indexing.

In the past, if you didn’t get on it pretty quickly, you were left out. It only took two or three days to get the job done. However, now they are also indexing the parents’ and spouses’ names, among other things, so it takes longer, but it’s well worth it. It also gives you plenty of time to help!

You can email Kelsey Berryhill, the volunteer coordinator, to add your name to the list of volunteers. Thanks for the help! 🙂

Jessica Reynolds Completes Her Family History Binder Posts

Jessica Reynolds has completed her final segment on how she created the family history binder as a gift for her father-in-law. The posts address the materials she used and how to obtain them, the how and why of her dividers, sections on photos, timelines, maps, and the documents she included — the last one being the one I was waiting for. 😀

It’s a wonderful project and she’s set forth great ideas on how to handle such things as including information on photos in an easily accessible and readable way.

Even though she says she created the blog to as an easy way to answer the flood of questions she received when she first mentioned her project in The Organized Genealogist Facebook group, I’m just guessing we might see more of her creative ideas posted on her blog. I, for one, am going to continue to follow it regularly.

Oklahoma Birth/Death Indexes Online

I was so excited to read this morning on Dick Eastman’s blog that Oklahoma has finally thrown a bone to home bound genealogists with roots there.

Unfortunately, the interface isn’t easy to use. Oh, the form fields are clearly labeled, etc., BUT in my last attempt, I got an error message that the search resulted in 17 results and the parameters needed to be adjusted accordingly. Um . . . Good luck if you’re looking for a “Smith” or “Jones” with a name that changes with every census enumeration.

That said, it’s a start. We who embrace this “hobby” are nothing if not determined.

Jessica Reynold’s Family History Binder

Last week, Jessica Reynolds posted information in The Organized Genealogist Facebook group about a family history binder that she made for her father-in-law for Christmas. It really is amazing.

Her post generated so much interest and questions about how she did it, she’s created a blog about her process called Do as I’m Doing. This is great news for those of you who aren’t on Facebook.

Her father-in-law, of course, was thrilled with the gift. What a great idea!

PACT Project Update

The next year is going to be even more hectic than usual. So I’m frantically trying to get organized. I don’t know why I’m hoping this effort will be better than any of the others, but remaining hopeful here. 🙂

I particularly wanted to get the PACT Project up to date. I planned on a quick hour or so. Now *that’s* funny! I don’t know what happened, I know I’ve updated it since April, but I had emails from Monica all the way back to almost the beginning of the year. Thinking maybe they were tasks I hadn’t marked “done” yet. No such luck.

So everything I could find has been added/changed/corrected. As you’ll see, the “What’s New” list for December might be quite daunting, but I really hope you find someone you’ve been looking for!

Happy hunting! 🙂

Tombstone of a Robidoux


Tombstone of a Robidoux.

Slab Marking Place Where Body of Franklin Robidoux Once Rested Unearthed by Graders.

Workmen employed in grading North Second street, in the vicinity of Cherry street, yesterday afternoon unearthed a plain marble slab which had marked for years the last resting place of J. H. Franklin Robidoux, the youngest son of Joseph Robidoux, the founder of St. Joseph. The headstone had crumbled only slightly and was in a good state of preservation. It was taken out about three feet below the surface of the earth.

The summit of the hill that slopes to the east and south in what is now Second street was formerly a cemetery. It was among the first platted after St. Joseph was laid out. Here nearly all of the members of the Robidoux family were buried. As the settlement known as the “Blacksnake Hills’ grew in size and population, it was found necessary to abandon the old cemetery.

The bodies buried there were removed to other graveyards and a majority of the headstones were moved with the caskets. The old cemetery site was platted into town lots and sold for residence property. Franklin Robidoux, after whom Franklin street was named, died in 1848. He passed away nine years prior to the death of his mother, Mrs. Robidoux having died on January 17, 1857. When the cemetery was abandoned descendants caused the bodies of members of the Robidoux family to be removed to other cemeteries.

It is presumed that in moving Franklin … [illegible] stone was … more grave … [paragraph illegible].

Source: St. Joseph News-Press, 11 Jul 1905, p. 6
Submitted by: Monica Schirmer Eshelman